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Cold is healthy Biohacking

Biohacking is a way to optimize yourself and your body in a natural way. With which method you can optimize your body in its function, so that it becomes more durable, healthier and naturally stable, you will learn in this article.

Exposed to the cold

When you expose yourself to cold, very amazing processes happen in your body. There are many different ways to be exposed to the cold. It starts with drinking cold water and goes all the way to taking a cold shower or even a bath.

If you are exposed to the cold stimulus, the enzyme mTOR is regulated. The enzyme has a very important control function in our organism. If too much of the enzyme mTOR is present, it can cause cancer development in the body. In addition, the degeneration of the body proceeds faster. However, if too little of the enzyme is present, the lack of mTOR stimulates autophagy. This process also takes place during a fasting cure. If your body is regularly exposed to cold, the tendency to develop cancer induced by the mTOR enzyme can be reduced over a long period of time. This type of biohacking therefore has the effect that the longevity of the body develops in a positive way. In addition, the fat tissue in the body is attacked in different ways by the cold stimulus. On the one hand, a great many enzymes in the body are stimulated, which have a fat-burning effect, and on the other hand the white fat, also called storage fat, is converted to brown fat. This fat produces heat and thus consumes more energy. This way of fighting fat is very effective and works in this context similar to regular exercise.

The cardiovascular system also benefits from the cold stimulus. With regular use, an improvement of cardiovascular complaints of up to twenty percent is achieved. This form of biohacking also has a very positive effect on the immune system. Finally, a change in the hormone balance can be observed: The hormones are stimulated and increased in the areas of adrenal function, thyroid function, sexual performance and fertility.

Possibilities of exposure to the cold stimulus

The following possibilities offer, in this order, healthy opportunities to slowly approach this type of biohacking:

1. drink cold water with ice cubes

If a so-called “ice headache” occurs, one can conclude that there are too many omega-6 fatty acids and too few omega-3 fatty acids in the body. Omega-6 fatty acids have an inflammatory effect, whereas omega-3 fatty acids have an anti-inflammatory effect. It is therefore necessary to redress this imbalance. To this end, omega-6 sources, especially animal foods and nuts and seeds, should be reduced. The omega-3 supply should also be increased. It is suitable to consume about two tablespoons of chia seed or ground linseed daily, for example in muesli or a smoothie.

2. bathing your face in ice-cold water

The face should be repeatedly immersed either in the washbasin or another suitable container. The skin should remain naturally pink.

3. cold showers

First of all, of course, you can take a hot shower as usual and then a cold shower. You should stay in the cold shower for as long as you can stand it. You start shaking, you set the process in motion. When trembling, the body burns many calories, roughly comparable to when doing sports.

4. cold bath

Once you are used to cold showers, the next step is to take a cold bath. Additional ice cubes can be added to the cold water. When you sit down in the bathtub, your breathing will probably be a little
flatter, but the body gets used to the cool temperature relatively quickly and gradually calms down again. Again, it is important to stay in the tub until you start to tremble. Please make sure that the water temperature never falls below ten degrees, otherwise blood vessels could be damaged.

5. outdoor ice swimming

If there is a lake, river or other body of water near you, they are just as suitable for ice-bathing in the cold seasons and may require a bit more courage.

6. thin clothes

A last and very simple way to expose yourself to the cold stimulus is to wear “too thin” clothing. For example, in winter you can go outside in a T-shirt or wear a thinner jacket. If you start to tremble, this would be the time to wrap yourself up warm again.

A great method that costs some effort, but is still very effective for human health. Once you start, you never want to stop. The effect of the freshness you feel in your body after the cold stimulus gives you a great and invigorating feeling, especially in the morning.

Studies and sources:

  • Cold-Inducible SIRT6 Regulates Thermogenesis of Brown and Beige Fat., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28723567
  • Brown Fat AKT2 Is a Cold-Induced Kinase that Stimulates ChREBP-Mediated De Novo Lipogenesis to Optimize Fuel Storage and Thermogenesis., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29153407
  • Control of brown and beige fat development., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27552974 Cold-Activated
  • Brown Adipose Tissue is Associated with Less Cardiometabolic Dysfunction in Young Adults with Obesity., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32170839
  • Fibroblast Growth Factor-21, Leptin, and Adiponectin Responses to Acute Cold-Induced Brown Adipose Tissue Activation., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31912874
  • Adiponectin receptor PAQR-2 signaling senses low temperature to promote C. elegans longevity by regulating autophagy., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31197136
  • Cordycepin promotes browning of white adipose tissue through an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent pathway., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30766785
  • Sarcolipin is a newly identified regulator of muscle-based thermogenesis in mammals., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22961106
  • Association of Melatonin Production with Seasonal Changes, Low Temperature, and Immuno-Responses in Hamsters, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6017911/
  • mTORC1 is Required for Brown Adipose Tissue Recruitment and Metabolic Adaptation to Cold, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5120333/
  • The effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on inflammation and cell stress responses in human skeletal muscle after resistance exercise., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27704555
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